Claudette's Specialties: Female and Male Hormonal Imbalances, PMS, Period Pain, Fibroids, Polycystic Ovaries/Syndrome, Endometriosis, Menopause, Prostate Problems, Low Libido, Natural Fertility Management: Contraception, Overcoming Infertility Problems (females and males), Preconception Care, Sex Selection, IVF support, Pregnancy Care: Pregnancy nutrition and remedies, Miscarriage support, Birth preparation, Doula: Childbirth support, Post-natal care for mother and child.

End Of Year Revamp



With the end of the year fast approaching, many people including myself are starting to feel a bit tired and worn out from an eventful 2013. When feeling sluggish, eating poorly starts to creep in and it's hard to shed your extra winter weight. Here are some healthy tips to energise your body and help you fit into your summer bikini!
  • Get moving! Endorphins produced when exercising stimulates more energy and makes you feel good. Choose something you enjoy, that is close to home or work and arrange to meet a buddy so you won't talk yourself out of it.
  • Elixir of Life: Drink at least 2 litres of water every day, carry a bottle of water with you wherever you go, always keep a jug of fresh water on your desk or at home. Contrary to popular belief, the more water you drink, the less fluid retention you will hold. If exercising a lot, add a little salt to your water to replace your electrolytes.
  • KIS - Keep it simple with meals based on a protein e.g. fish, chicken, eggs, meat, beans and salad or vegetables e.g. wholegrain sandwich with roast beef, mustard, avocado and rocket.
  • Don't Skip Meals: Eating every 3 hours boosts your metabolism so you burn through calories faster and have higher energy levels.
  • Snack It: Everyone gets caught out on snacks but rather than be tempted by the quick fix of the biscuit jar or chocolate bar, keep a bag of almonds in your desk drawer, dip vege sticks rather than chips into humus or salsa, eat hard cheddar cheese rather than soft Brie or Camembert, head to the juice bar, keep a few hard boiled eggs in the fridge for emergency snacks or a quick breakfast with a piece of fruit on the way to work, keep some sachets of miso soup in your desk drawer, a fruit smoothie (with yoghurt rather than ice cream) is healthier than a milkshake or Cherry Ripe. By adding 1 commercial muffin to what you normally eat each day, you increase your "bad" trans fats by 2%, but your risk of a heart attack increases by 93%!
  • Glycaemic Index Load: If you eat a bowl of ice cream, your blood sugar level goes through the roof, but if you eat a bowl of white rice or white pasta and measure your blood sugar again, it will be exactly the same! So it's not just about the amount of sugar or fat content but how quickly foods breakdown to sugar and are absorbed. Another example is broccoli has 4% carbohydrate and strawberries have 5% carbohydrate, while white bread has 75% carbohydrate content. As a result, 1kg of strawberries is the equivalent of 1 slice of white bread. Always eat wholegrain breads or crackers, brown or basmati rice, try Quinoa for a nutritious change (cook just like rice but only 10 minutes!) and combine these with lots of vegetables and some protein to slow down your digestion and make you feel full faster so you don't overeat.
  • Add Veggies to...Everything: Load up your meals with vegetables so there's less room for starchy grains and nutrient poor white flour products. At lunch, you can stuff a wrap with lettuce, rocket, tomato, grated carrot, sprouts, capsicum, avocado and bulk up your dinner meals with extra veggies thrown in. The rise in the incidence of asthma has been linked to diets low in fresh vegetables. We need a serve at every meal!
  • Start With Salad or Soup: Starting with a salad or soup can help you eat less over the course of meal, says researchers. It also ensures you get your 5 portions of colourful vegetables per day and is visually satisfying to think you can have 2 plates of food rather than only half a hamburger.
  • Late Night Dinners: If you arrive home late rather than having a quick fix like instant noodles or a microwaveable dinner, try having an omelette or a tin of salmon or sardines with a salad.
  • Healthy Takeaway: When time has got the better of you, some healthy takeaway options are Thai stir fry, brown rice sushi, Indian chicken tikka and dahl, grilled fish from your local fish shop, BBQ chicken with salad.
  • Ordering Out: Ask for rice or salad rather than chips or mash.
  • Dressing Up? Topping your salad with a creamy dressing will clog your system so keep it simple with extra virgin olive oil or flaxseed oil combined with apple cider vinegar or fresh lemon juice.
  • Sweet Tooth: Half a cup of natural yoghurt has fewer calories and improves digestion rather than half a cup of ice cream. Choose fruit such as pineapple or melon rather than cake or biscuits to fill up on fibre and water. 1 Tim Tam is equivalent to 2 cups of watermelon or 1.5 cups of pineapple! Avoid dried fruit which is high in sugar and sulfur preservatives: 1/4 cup of sultanas contains the same calories as 1 cup of grapes. Add a bag of apples or oranges to your weekly shopping list so you've always got some fruit on hand.
  • Get Some Shut Eye: If you don't get enough sleep, you crave sugars for energy and you make poor decisions regarding your food choices. 7-8 hours sleep every night aids weight loss!
  • Hidden Sugars: Sugar is highly addictive and it is in so many products nowadays e.g. cereals, muesli bars, flavoured yogurt so it's hard to avoid but eating excess sugars only contributes to weight gain and long term health problems. Throw out anything in your cupboards that has ingredients that your grandmother would not recognise and rather than eating packet products, eat fresh food.
By Claudette Wadsworth
BHSc, BA, Adv DN, Nut D, DRM, PostGrad NFM, MATMS, MNHAA

Naturopath, Nutritionist, specialist in Women's Health and Fertility
Bondi Junction 02 9389 3689 

info@claudettewadsworth.com.au

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Return Of The Ancient Grain - Quinoa


Quinoa pronounced "keen-wah" has recently moved from health food shops to the supermarket aisle. It is quick and easy to cook as well as gluten free which is great for those with wheat allergies. It is an excellent substitute for couscous or rice and can be used in almost every type of meal - breakfast smoothies and cereals, hearty casseroles, salads, soups, and your favourite baked sweet treat.

It is labelled as an ancient grain because it has been grown for domestic consumption in the Andes Mountains of Equador, Bolivia, Peru and Colombia for over 3000 - 4000 years. It is not a true cereal or grain because it is not a member of the grass family. Instead, quinoa is closely related to the species of beetroots and spinach. It is now grown in Australia and it is actually the seeds that are harvested and eaten.

Quinoa comes in 3 different colours: white, red and black with slightly varying tastes and nutritional qualities. It has an exceptional nutritional profile, packed with low-GI carbohydrates and fibre, along with B vitamins (including folic acid) and minerals such as zinc, magnesium, potassium and phosphorus. It is also a complete protein containing all the essential amino acids, making it essential for vegetarians and vegans.

How to cook it
One cup of quinoa to 2 cups of water or stock. Bring it to the boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 10-12 minutes. Turn off the heat, leave the covered saucepan on the stovetop for another 3 minutes. Fluff the cooked quinoa with a fork and allow to cool. Try my Quinoa Summer Salad from November last year.

Moist Chocolate Cake     
serves 8-16


Ingredients
2/3 cup white quinoa
1 1/3 cups water
1/3 cup milk
4 large eggs
1 tsp pure vanilla extract
3/4 cup butter, melted
1 1/2 cups rapadura sugar or coconut sugar (available form health food stores) or 1 cup maple syrup
1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder or raw cacao powder
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt

Bring the quinoa and water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and leave the covered saucepan on the stovetop for another 3 minutes. Fluff the cooked quinoa with a fork and allow to cool.

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees. Lightly grease two 20cm round or square cake tins. Line the bottoms of the tins with baking paper.

Combine milk, eggs and vanilla in a blender or food processor. Add 2 cups of cooked quinoa and the butter and continue to blend until smooth. Whisk together the sugar, cocoa, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl.

Add the contents of the blender evenly between the two tins and bake on the centre oven rack for 40 -45 minutes or until a knife inserted in the centre comes out clean. Remove the cakes from the oven and cool completely before removing from the tins.

Serve with cream and berries. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 1 month.

By Claudette Wadsworth
BHSc, BA, Adv DN, Nut D, DRM, PostGrad NFM, MATMS, MNHAA

Naturopath, Nutritionist, specialist in Women's Health and Fertility
Bondi Junction 02 9389 3689 

info@claudettewadsworth.com.au

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Macadamia Nut and Rocket Pesto



This tasty spread/sauce is perfect for lunch, dinner or a snack.

Macadamia nuts are not only good for you, but are also scrumptious to eat and an Australian traditional food. Macadamia nuts were eaten by Aboriginal people on the east coast of Australia who may have called them maroochi, bauple, gyndlm jinilli or boombera. Macadamia nuts contain omega- 3 fatty acids, which are proven to reduce levels of bad cholesterol, along with protein, complex carbohydrates and fibre.

This recipe is versatile: use as a base flavour with your favourite grain e.g. rice, quinoa, add it to your sandwich at lunchtime, mix it with olive oil and vinegar to make it into a salad dressing or put it on some crackers with tomato for a health snack.

Makes 1 cup

Ingredients

½ cup roasted/raw macadamia nuts
1 ½ cup rocket leaves
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
½ cup extra- virgin olive oil
50 grams grated parmesan cheese (optional)
Salt and pepper

Method
  1. Place nuts, rocket and garlic into a small food processor or blender. Blend (stop to scrape down the sides occasionally) until almost smooth.
  2. With the motor running, add the oil in a slow and steady stream. Process until the oil is blended into the mixture. Add parmesan cheese, if you like. Season with salt and pepper. Blend until combined.
  3. Use pesto straightaway or transfer it to an airtight storage container and store in your refrigerator. A thin layer of olive oil on the top of the pesto will keep it from going off.

By Claudette Wadsworth
BHSc, BA, Adv DN, Nut D, DRM, PostGrad NFM, MATMS, MNHAA

Naturopath, Nutritionist, specialist in Women's Health and Fertility
Bondi Junction 02 9389 3689 and Sydney CBD 02 9268 9000

info@claudettewadsworth.com.au
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Roman Lentil Soup


The hearty Roman soldier carried 35 kilos plus his armour and walked 30 kilometres per day. His fare consisted of coarse bread and a porridge of lentils or millet. Lentils are perhaps the most nutritious of all legumes. They were also a favorite legume of Dr. Weston A. Price, author of the infamous nutritional primer Nutrition and Physical Degeneration because of their very high phosphorous content. Phosphorous is the second most plentiful mineral in the body. It plays a role in maintaining the body’s acid/alkaline balance, something most people struggle with today given the high levels of inflammatory diseases which trace their roots to over-acidity in the body. This ia a hearty winter soup for the whole family. Make extra and take in a thermos to work or keep to heat up when you get home on a cold night. 

Serves 8

3 medium onions or 3 leeks, sliced
3 carrots, sliced
2 Tb butter
2 Tb extra virgin olive oil or organic coconut oil
8 cups of filtered water or stock
2 cups of brown or red lentils, soaked for 7 hours overnight in water (throw out the water)
several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together with string or 2 tsp of dried thyme
1/2 tsp dried green peppercorns
1/4 cup of fresh lemon juice
sea salt or fish sauce and pepper

In a large stainless steel pot, cook onions or leeks and carrots gently in butter and olive oil. When vegetables are soft, add water/stock and lentils and bring to the boil. The lentils will produce a great deal of foam - be sure to skim it off. Reduce heat and add thyme and crushed peppercorns. Simmer, covered, until lentils are tender, about 1/2 hour. Remove the thyme. You can puree soup with a handheld blender for a smooth taste. Thin with water to desired consistency. Reheat slightly and add lemon juice. Ladle into heated bowls and serve with dollop of cultured cream.

Variation: Curried Lentil Soup: add 2 Tb of curry powder or curry paste along with thyme.

Variation: Split Pea Soup: use 2 cups of split peas instead of lentils.


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For The Men...Keeping Your Testosterone Pumping


Last week I attended a seminar on Andropause, or male menopause, testosterone deficiency and erectile dysfunction. All three are more common than most men would like to admit, with Andropause now medically recognised as a normal part of ageing, occurring between the ages of 40 to 55 with a significant drop in sex hormone levels. Signs of testosterone deficiency in men include loss of libido and physical agility, poor erection and low ejaculate volume, infertility, shrinkage or enlargement of the prostate, depression, anxiety, fat accumulation around the belly and hips, loss of muscle, high cholesterol and aged appearance. Studies show that this decline in testosterone can actually put one at risk for other health problems like heart disease and osteoporosis.

What Depletes Testosterone Levels?

  • Age
  • Intense endurance sports or exercise
  • Intense emotional stress 
  • Foods high in saturated fats e.g hot chips, deep fried oily foods, animal fats
  • Adrenal fatigue (chronic stress exhausts the body)
  • Medications: e.g Antidepressants (SSRI's)
Pharmaceutical DHEA or Testosterone
A number of recent studies have demonstrated that most of the DHEA or androstenedione gets converted into oestrogens rather than testosterone once in the body. These oestrogens stimulate the mammary tissue causing the common side effect of breast development in men. However, once the hormones are stopped, it is not reversible. 

Naturopathic Treatments
Protein foods increase testosterone production so a diet high in good quality, lean protein is essential. Omega 3 oils found in cold water oily fish such as sardines, salmon, trout, mackerel, flaxseed oil, nuts and seeds are another building block of hormone production and ensure healthy sperm and prostate function. Zinc, magnesium and selenium along with other minerals are also important for testosterone production and to counter stress.

There are a few key herbs that have been shown in studies to increase testosterone and DHEA-S production in the body such as Korean Ginseng, Rhodiola and Withania. It is important to see a qualified herbalist to assess the best combination of herbs and the correct dosage for you. 

Erectile Dysfunction
Only 5-10% of erectile dysfunction is caused by low testosterone. More common causes are heart disease, diabetes, nerve damage, stress, side effects of drugs, exhaustion, circulatory problems. Basically being in good health and being relaxed ensures a strong libido and great performance!
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Avocado Chocolate Mousse


It does sound strange but it tastes sensational and is healthy too! Quick, easy, guilt-free summer treat.
Courtesy of quirkycooking.blogspot.com.au


Ingredients:
  • 1 ripe Avocado
  • 150gm raw Cashews
  • 350gm Ice cubes
  • 35gm Cacao (or Cocoa)
  • 100gm Dates
  • 1 tsp Vanilla bean paste or essence
Blend raw cashews in food processor. Then add ice cubes and blend again. Scrape down sides of bowl and add vanilla, cacao powder and dates and reblend. Finally add the avocado flesh and blend. If it is not thick enough to stay formed into peaks, add another handful of ice cubes. Spoon into glasses and top with fresh raspberries, blueberries or strawberries and serve. Or freeze for later but if it is frozen solid, thaw before using - like heavenly healthy soft-serve ice cream!

  • Heart Health Avocados are high in healthy Omega 3 oils which decrease inflammation,  now recognised as the leading cause of heart disease.
  • Lower Cholesterol Avocados are also high in beta-sitosterol, a compound shown to lower cholesterol levels with research showing a 17% drop in cholesterol by including 1/2 avocado in your diet daily. Also high in fibre which binds on to the cholesterol to take it out of the body.
  • Fertile Ovaries & Pregnancy Half an avocado contains 144mcg of folate which is needed during pregnancy for the developing foetus as well as being rich in good oils and vitamin E to maintain youthful ovaries and eggs.
  • Eye Health High in carotenoid, Lutein, which protects against macular degeneration and cataracts.
  • Prostate Balance These anti-inflammatory Omega 3 oils help reduce enlargement of the prostate or more commonly known as BPH, Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy.
  • Youthful Skin Avocados are a rich source of Vitamin C which protects your skin from oxidative damage. Vitamin C is also needed to build collagen to keep your skin strong and elastic.
  • Cacao is the unprocessed form of cocoa which retains its high antioxidant benefits without the sugars. Available from health food stores - preferrable to cocoa. Be aware it contains caffeine so may keep you awake! As a treat, it is very healthy so long as you don't rely on it like other forms of caffeine which then end up pushing your adrenal glands, exhausting the body and upsetting hormonal balance. 
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Detox For Summer


Now is the perfect time to detoxify your body just like spring cleaning your house to help you feel refreshed and energised for the coming summer action!

Have you ever noticed that many people treat their CARS better than their bodies? They would never ignore a warning light for an oil change or regular maintenance, but they often ignore the tell-tale signs that their body is in desperate need of a tune up. An unfortunate fact of our modern life is that even the healthiest body struggles with inferior nutrition, pollutants in the air, water and food supply, and A lack of healthy activity. It’s no wonder that most of us don’t feel like the Formula One racing cars that we should!

Some Of The Body’s Warning Signs:
  • Do you feel less healthy and energetic than other people your age?
  • Do you struggle with your weight or fluid retention?
  • Do you have digestive disturbances (wind, bloating, flatulence, constipation, heartburn)?
  • Do you have dark circles under your eyes, post-nasal drip or hayfever symptoms?
  • Do you have bad breath or body odour?
  • Do you have sore, aching muscles or acne?
Detoxing at least once a year will help to keep you feeling and looking great!
  • Add Veggies to...Everything: Load up your meals with vegetables so there's less room for starchy grains and nutrient poor white flour products. At lunch, you can stuff a wrap with lettuce, rocket, tomato, grated carrot, sprouts, capsicum, avocado and bulk up your dinner meals with extra veggies thrown in. The rise in the incidence of asthma has been linked to diets low in fresh vegetables. We need a serve at every meal!
  • Start with Salad or Soup: Starting with a salad or soup can help you eat less over the course of meal, says researchers. It also ensures you get your 5 portions of colourful vegetables per day and is visually satisfying to think you can have 2 plates of food rather than only half a hamburger.
  • Juice It! Freshly squeezed juices flush your system with antioxidants and aid detoxification so rather than getting an afternoon coffee to pep you up, head for the juice bar. Carrot, celery, beetroot, ginger are particularly effective, while watermelon, pineapple and mint give a little summer zing.
  • Green Smoothies are all the rage! Rather than juicing, buy a blender & simply blend your green veges with water for a quick antioxidant-rich, filling snack in itself: kale leaves, spinach, half a cucumber, half a lemon, 1 green apple or a banana for taste: bon appetit!
  • Elixir of Life: Drink at least 2 litres of water every day, carry a bottle of water with you wherever you go, always keep a jug of fresh water on your desk or at home. Contrary to popular belief, the more water you drink, the less fluid retention you will hold. If exercising a lot, add a little salt to your water to replace your electrolytes.
  • Going Herbal: Make some iced herbal tea by adding ice cubes, slices of lemon/lime and a sprig of fresh herbs. Herbal teas can even be frozen into ice blocks for your children with added honey.
    Green tea and roasted dandelion coffee help the liver detoxify, while lemongrass and spearmint teas have a refreshing zing for summer.
  • Dessert Selection: Half a cup of natural yoghurt has fewer calories and improves digestion rather than half a cup of ice cream. Choose fruit such as pineapple or melon rather than cake or biscuits to fill up on fibre and water. 1 Tim Tam is equivalent to 2 cups of watermelon or 1.5 cups of pineapple! Avoid dried fruit which is high in sugar and sulfur preservatives: 1/4 cup of sultanas contains the same calories as 1 cup of grapes. Add a bag of apples or oranges to your weekly shopping list so you've always got some fruit on hand.
  • Glycaemic Index Load: If you eat a bowl of ice cream, your blood sugar level goes through the roof, but if you eat a bowl of white rice or white pasta and measure your blood sugar again, it will be exactly the same! So it's not just about the amount of sugar or fat content but how quickly foods breakdown to sugar and are absorbed. Another example is broccoli has 4% carbohydrate and strawberries have 5% carbohydrate, while white bread has 75% carbohydrate content. As a result, 1kg of strawberries is the equivalent of 1 slice of white bread. Always eat wholegrain breads or crackers, brown or basmati rice, try Quinoa for a nutritious change (cook just like rice but only 10 minutes!) and combine these with lots of vegetables and some protein to slow down your digestion and make you feel full faster so you don't overeat. 
  • Snack it! Everyone gets caught out on snacks but rather than be tempted by the quick fix of the biscuit jar or chocolate bar, keep a bag of almonds in your desk drawer, dip vege sticks rather than chips into humus or salsa, eat hard cheddar cheese rather than soft Brie or Camembert, head to the juice bar, keep a few hard boiled eggs in the fridge for emergency snacks or a quick breakfast with a piece of fruit on the way to work, keep some sachets of miso soup in your desk drawer, a fruit smoothie (with yoghurt rather than ice cream) is healthier than a milkshake or Cherry Ripe. By adding 1 commercial muffin to what you normally eat each day, you increase your "bad" trans fats by 2%, but your risk of a heart attack increases by 93%!
  • Dressing Up? Topping your salad with a creamy dressing will clog your system so keep it simple with extra virgin olive oil or flaxseed oil combined with apple cider vinegar or fresh lemon juice. 
  • Detox Your Mind: A good detox also includes some decluttering of your mind and your life to make space for the new to unfold. Take some time out for yourself to relax and rebuild your energy stores - there's plenty of summer parties ahead so you won't miss out! Consider what no longer serves you in your life....and let it go. Spend time doing what you love and are passionate about rather than wasting your time worrying about what everyone else is doing. Surround yourself with those people that genuinely care and bring out your best rather than simply boosting your ego.
There are no dress rehearsals and no one can play your life for you. This is your time to SHINE. Breathe in the life and beauty all around you - it's your own reflection shining back at you. Go for it!
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High Cholesterol - Try these Tips

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is essential in the body to carry around fats and sugars and to make hormones. It is only a problem if there is too much as it gets deposited in arteries. 80% of cholesterol is made by the body to carry around excess fats and sugars; only 20% comes from diet. Therefore, it is usually not high cholesterol foods in the diet which is the problem, eg eggs but poor quality fats and sugar. Research now says it is safe to have 6 eggs a week. Similarly, if your cholesterol is too low, this will cause problems such as depression, violent behaviour, aggression and increased risk of cancer.

Cholesterol foods to avoid: organ meats eg. brain, kidney, liver, caviar, crustaceans eg. prawns, lobster, oysters, crab, too much dairy especially butter, cream, cheese. 

Increase Omega 3 oils which boost HDL good cholesterol, lower Triglycerides and have a platelet unsticking effect in arteries: cold water deep-sea oily fish (salmon, mackerel, trout, herring, cod, mullet, sardines) eat 3/week; nuts and seeds: a handful/day to sprinkle on cereal, salads or snacks: walnuts, almonds, pecans, Brazil, linseeds (avoid peanuts); cold pressed oils to use raw in salad dressings (not commercially processed salad dressings) or drizzle over vegetables: flaxseed oil, extra virgin olive oil 1Tb/day; avoid canola or vegetable oil and use avocado on bread instead of margarine or butter.

Avoid Trans fats which are synthetic fats that are fairly new to our food chain due to modern processing methods but they cause free radical damage to our cells,. They are formed when vegetable oils are hydrogenated as in margarine, hardened in shortening eg. packet biscuits and pastries, or, in oils that have been overheated as in deep frying, or, oxidized oils which are rancid oils. They harden and thicken the food product so it will not go soft or go off quickly but remains crisp for months on your pantry shelf. But they also do this to our cell membranes and arteries once we eat them. Avoid margarine, hot chips, French fries, deep fried, doughnuts, packet biscuits, commercially-produced muffins, pastries and rancid oils. 

Many companies use trans fat instead of oil as it is less expensive, improves taste and texture of food product and extends storage shelf life. Unfortunately, food companies are not required to list it on the nutrition label so we have no way of knowing how much trans fat we are eating. Also, there is no upper safety limit for the recommended daily intake of trans fat, simply that “it should be as low as possible”. 
However, by adding one steak to your diet per day, you increase your saturated fat by 5%, which increases your risk of a heart attack by 17%. By adding one commercial muffin to what you normally eat each day, you increase your trans fats by 2%, but your risk of a heart attack increases by 93%! Trans fats make platelets sticky, increasing the likelihood of a clot in a small blood vessel causing strokes, heart attacks or circulatory occlusion. They can increase blood cholesterol levels by up to 15% and blood fat levels up to 47%.

Other cholesterol lowering tips:
  • 1 Tb of psyllium husks and 1/2 squeezed lemon in glass of warm water on rising
  • Add 1-2Tb flaxmeal or ground linseeds to cereal or in smoothie each day
  • Eat artichokes and replace meat with vegetable proteins occasionally: chickpeas, lentils, borlotti beans, etc - mix through salads, add to soups/stews
  • Drink roasted Dandelion root tea or green tea instead of coffee as coffee raises cholesterol and blood pressure. Try fresh sprigs of rosemary in hot water as a tea - excellent for the liver!
  • Reduce all sugars, sweets, chocolate, fruit juice, soft drink, dried fruit and limit your fresh fruit to a maximum 3 pieces per day
  • Avoid white flour products and increase your fibre by eating wholegrain bread
  • Reduce alcohol: moderation means 2 glasses every 2nd night for men and half this for women
  • Drink vegetable juices which help flush out the liver and are full of antioxidants eg. carrot, celery, beetroot, ginger, spinach
  • Smoking: 70% increase in death rate and 3-5 times increase in risk of heart disease
  • Decrease stress: stimulates more cholesterol production as cholesterol is the precursor to the stress hormones: try deep breathing, meditation, massage, yoga, tai chi, relaxing hot bath, time out in nature
  • Exercise: 1 hour 3x week - whatever you enjoy!!






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